Episode 19 | Part Two: A Conversation with Kevin G. Armstrong

Episode Information

Clint concludes his conversation with the author of “The Miracle Manager: Why True Leaders Rarely Make Great Managers”, Kevin G. Armstrong.  Kevin leads a group of advisors at the Interdependent Training Group which advises business leaders on creating clear vision and implementing strategies to hold their management teams accountable. In part two, Kevin explains the two key rules of attitude, why you can’t be powerful without being vulnerable, the major drawbacks of electronic communications, and why it’s not good enough to be efficient you have to be effective.

Visit KevinGArmstrong.com to learn more about Kevin and download a free chapter of the book.  You can connect with Kevin on LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter.

About Kevin G. Armstrong:
Kevin’s mission is to disrupt the way we think and work, and his obsession is challenging the definitions of the words we use on a daily basis. Kevin uses his decades of experience to help business owners—from “mom and pops” to Fortune 500s—embrace and implement simple, proven management solutions in building high-performing, outcome- based teams (though, as his clients have discovered, simple doesn’t always mean easy!).

Kevin has taught both high school and college, owned and sold small businesses, been an investment firm top seller, and worked in the C-Suite, overseeing agencies throughout North America. He is also an active speaker and author, whose arsenal of revolutionary concepts and techniques have been published on Forbes.com, Thrive Global, in Authority Magazine, and in his Forbes-published book, The Miracle Manager: Why True Leaders Rarely Make Great Managers.

Kevin leads a group of advisors at the Interdependent Training Group (ITG) which advises business leaders on creating clear vision and implementing strategies to hold their management teams accountable for delivering on their vision.

For the past 20+ years of his career, Kevin has studied the important differences between the roles of ‘leader’ and ‘manager’ in business. His speaking engagements expand on this concept in an interactive, thought-provoking manner which disrupts current thinking and leaves audiences with a new understanding of how the future of performance lies in focusing on purpose, not position.